1st Texas Infantry Square Battle Flag 52"x52" Sewn Cotton
1st Texas Infantry Square Battle Flag 52″x52″ Sewn Cotton

1st Texas Infantry Square Battle Flag 52″x52″ Sewn Cotton

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1st Texas Infantry Square Flag Made of Heavy Cotton Fabric

This is a fully embroidered and sewn cotton flag. Cotton flags feature a heavy, luxurious look and feel. They are commonly used indoors because of their old-world, hand-crafted appearance. This flag is intended for indoor display or temporary outdoor special event/parade use only as it is not suitable for prolonged exposure to the outdoor elements. Cotton flags are also suitable for tea-staining and/or framing and hanging indoors.

  • Heavy, soft cotton fabric
  • Sewn panels and appliqued stars with embroidered edges
  • Heavy cotton header with three brass grommets
  • Flag size: 52″ x 52″

This is a reproduction of the 1st Texas Infantry Regiment flag. The actual dimensions are not exactly the same as the original flag. The artwork is visible on both sides of the flag.

History of the 1st Texas Infantry Regiment Square Battle Flag

The 1st Texas Infantry “1st bunting issue” square battle flag was configured in a similar fashion to the traditional square battle flag but with only 12 stars. The center star was missing (as was the battle flag of Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Cavalry Regiment). Issued to the 1st Texas Infantry in the spring or summer of 1862 it was carried into battle in conjunction with the “Wigfall Flag” until they both were captured along with many men of the 1st Texas at the battle of Antietam. The 1st Texas was reformed after a prisoner exchange and issued a “4th bunting issue” square battle flag also with 12 stars. This flag was carried until it was captured at Appomattox just one day before Lee surrendered. All three original flags are on display at the Texas Library and Archives Commission in Austin Texas.

The 1st Texas Infantry was organized in Virginia and made up of 12 companies of Texas troops that had already traveled east to join the Confederate Army. It, along with the 4th and 5th Texas Infantry regiments became part of Hood’s Texas Brigade, named after its commanding general, John Bell Hood. The 1st Texas fought in every major battle in which the Army of Northern Virginia was engaged with the exception of Chancellorsville. Beginning with the Peninsula Campaign or “Seven Days Battle” from March thru July of 1862 then through the Second Battle of Bull Run in August 1862 and into Maryland during Lee’s first invasion of the North where they fought at the Battle of Antietam at Sharpsburg Maryland September 17th, 1862. This was the deadliest single-day battle of the entire Civil War with a total of over 22,000 casualties from both sides combined. The battle began at dawn when Joseph Hooker’s 1st corps attacked Lee’s left flank across Miller’s cornfield. Although badly outnumbered, Hood’s Texas Brigade which consisted of the 1st, 4th, and 5th Texas Infantries along with the 18th Georgia Infantry and Hampton’s Legion of South Carolina mounted a counter-attack driving the Union troops all the way back to their defensive artillery positions, thus preventing Lee’s army from being routed from its flank. They did so, however, at a heavy cost. 186 out of the 226 men of the 1st Texas were killed or wounded. This amounted to more than an 82% casualty rate which was the highest of any unit, North or South for the entire war. After the remnants who were captured were returned through a prisoner exchange, the 1st Texas Infantry was re-established. They were engaged at Gettysburg where they suffered 20% casualties on the second day of fighting at Devil’s Den. The 1st Texas continued to serve throughout the end of the war until General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse effectively ending the war.

Additional information

Weight23 oz